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Comparison of Different Healthcare Profession Measures

The HPSA designation for Primary Care Providers refers to doctors of allopathic or osteopathic medicine in the fields of Family Practice, General Practice, Pediatrics, Internal Medicine and Obstetrics and Gynecology (OB/GYN). HPSA scores for Mississippi counties currently range from 0 to 23 (the higher score indicates a higher shortage designation). The score is based on a combination of population-to-provider ratio, poverty rate, travel distance/time to nearest accessible source of care and infant mortality/low birth weight. In the table below we have ranked the counties with the highest HPSA scores for Primary Care. As a comparison we have also calculated a simple ratio of Primary Care Provider to resident population (e.g., 1/10,000), based on 2009 licensure data. Although we have tried to limit the ranking to the top 10 counties with the greatest health care infrastructure need, in cases where multiple counties were given the same score, we did not divide the category and exclude the file. We have color coded counties which made the list using both calculations.

The HPSA designation for Dental Care Dental HPSA designation refers to Doctors of Dental Surgery (DDS) or Doctors of Dental Medicine (DMD). These doctors must practice general and/or pediatric dentistry.  Dentists who practice only in a dental specialty are excluded from Dental HPSA criteria.  Endodontist, orthodontist, prosthodontist, periodontists, etc. are excluded. HPSA scores for Mississippi counties currently range from 0 to 21 (the higher score indicates a higher shortage designation). The score is based on a combination of population-to-provider ratio, poverty rate, travel distance/time to nearest accessible source of care and the presence of fluoridated water. In the table below we have ranked the counties with the highest HPSA scores for Dental Care. As a comparison we have also calculated a simple ratio of Dental Care Provider to resident population (e.g., 1/10,000), based on 2010 licensure data. Although we have tried to limit the ranking to the top 10 counties with the greatest health care infrastructure need, in cases where multiple counties were given the same score, we did not divide the category and exclude the file. We have color coded counties which made the list using both calculations.

Mississippi Mental HPSAs are based on the definition for the doctor. They must be doctors of allopathic or osteopathic medicine specializing in the field of psychiatry (psychiatrists). HPSA scores for Mississippi counties currently range from 0 to 21 (the higher score indicates a higher shortage designation). The score is based on a combination of population-to-provider ratio, poverty rate, travel distance/time to nearest accessible source of care, ratio of the population under 18 and over 65 and the prevalence of alcohol or substance abuse. In the table below we have ranked the counties with the highest HPSA scores for Mental Health. As a comparison we have also calculated a simple ratio of Dental Care Provider to resident population (e.g., 1/10,000), based on 2010 licensure data. Although we have tried to limit the ranking to the top 10 counties with the greatest health care infrastructure need, in cases where multiple counties were given the same score, we did not divide the category and exclude the file. In the case of ratios, we listed all counties without a licensed practitioner. We have color coded counties which made the list using both calculations.

We also isolated for special attention two Primary Care sub-disciplines, pediatrics and Obstetrics and Gynecology. Although we calculated the number of pediatricians per 10,000 residents aged 0 to 19, we found that there are 39 in Mississippi without a Pediatrics practitioner in the county, according to 2009 licensure data. This does not take into account that parents may cross county lines for their child to be seen by a pediatrician. It also does not account for practitioners who practice in multiple offices, the calculations were based on the primary office of the licensed practitioner.

There are 50 counties in Mississippi without an Obstetrics and Gynecology practitioner in the county, according to 2009 licensure data. This does not take into account that patients may cross county lines to be seen by an Obstetrics and Gynecology. It also does not account for practitioners who practice in multiple offices, the calculations were based on the primary office of the licensed practitioner.

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Last updated: 8/24/2015